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April 14, 2013
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Loth Butler's Pet by humon Loth Butler's Pet by humon
My site [link]

People requested fanservice with Tim, so here you go.

And might as well clear this up now. Some Americans have expressed concern over Noel being the gardener and feel it's a degrading stereotype. This is supposed to take place in England and here a stereotypical gardener of a household is most certainly not black. The gardener is even higher in the hierarchy than the butler because the English love their gardens so much. :XD:
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:iconjackiereaper:
JackieReaper Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
O.O
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:icondewani90:
Dewani90 Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
last panel, does that guy has eyes behind his back also?
Reply
:iconkazali:
Kazali Featured By Owner May 22, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haha, I learned something new about international race relations today. (And also, big things can come on small feminine men) :P
Reply
:iconmiwokgirl101:
Miwokgirl101 Featured By Owner May 21, 2013
New OTP!
Reply
:iconred-stained-december:
red-stained-december Featured By Owner May 17, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Noel seems to like flowers, why is it wrong for him to do what he loves?

Pfffft, Dana I love the sister comic to this X3
Reply
:iconjavagirl98:
javagirl98 Featured By Owner May 4, 2013
*scrolls down to read comments*
*sees mile-long paragraphs about racism*
*scrolls back up*
Reply
:iconbigsmoke11:
BigSmoke11 Featured By Owner May 8, 2013  Student Artist
same
Reply
:iconmegacatgirl13:
MegaCatGirl13 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013  Student Artist
That's one big censor right there ouo
Reply
:iconelektraeriseros:
elektraeriseros Featured By Owner May 9, 2013
*brb, dying* :XD:
Reply
:iconshmorygilmore:
ShmoryGilmore Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
LOL Adam is adorable! XD
Reply
:iconduo1:
Duo1 Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013   Traditional Artist
i like Dana
looks handsome to me ;)
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:iconprismaticangel:
PrismaticAngel Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2013
Those darn English and their gardens. :XD: But Kudos for making a Black English Gardener.
Reply
:iconhalfdragonhal:
halfdragonhal Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013
why his leg blacked out. THATS NO LEG.
Reply
:iconajinu-okami:
AJInu-Okami Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013  Student Digital Artist
That's not a leg....
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:iconhalfdragonhal:
halfdragonhal Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013
grammer nazi hate starwars joke's.
Reply
:iconajinu-okami:
AJInu-Okami Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Huh? I never watched Star Wars, so I didn't even know it was a joke.
Reply
:iconlukaner-z:
lukaner-Z Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013
omg
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:iconsampixie:
Sampixie Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Don't lwt some of my American bretherin bother you. most of us are assholes. an like to pick on things to start debats. and don't think of the time periods of witch a piece is depicted in. ^^
Reply
:icononshuu-and-shigatsu:
Onshuu-and-Shigatsu Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
"English love their gardens so much."
We do?
(Thinks back to childhood gardens and vegetable patches at school, home and relatives houses)
Oh God! We do!
Reply
:iconmiku2:
Miku2 Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
Omg this is so cute XD
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:icontwilarose:
Twilarose Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013  Student Writer
Now the question must be asked: What type of underwear does Tim wear? I expected panties because he crossdresses, but now I'm not to sure. I mean surely simple panties couldn't possibly hold that monster!
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:iconkittychan2005:
Kittychan2005 Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
XD
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:iconthepeaceluffer:
ThePeaceluffer Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
lol
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:icondarkdamzel101:
darkdamzel101 Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013
I want to thank you for understanding and accepting our culture enough to explain so kindly. I know as Americans we have the stereotype to be ignorant, but we see racism everywhere because that's how our culture still is today. Any minorities are still being forced into a lesser status, and to say the truth we aren't as developed as Europeans to accepting people different than us. We are trying though, and it certainly helps when there are people like you willing to help rather than judge.
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:iconkazali:
Kazali Featured By Owner May 22, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I agree with everything except the "we aren't as developed as Europeans" bit. Europeans can be just as racist as Americans can; they just express it in different ways. :B
Reply
:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Student
North Americans see rascism in everything. They're so obsessed about themselves that they think everywhere else is the same.

Anyways, nice lil comic :D
Reply
:icondreamscape195:
Dreamscape195 Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013
o.O I'm from Michigan (certainly a more "northern" state) and I never see any racism... in fact racism is so rare near where I live that I often find myself shocked when I run into it here on the internet. I can't tell you how many times I've run into something and been confused over why people were upset in the comments until I learned it was a stereotype of some sort.

Which kind of makes me wonder about your comment here. Is there really any truth to that claim? A study or documentary that you learned it from? Or is it in and of itself just a stereotype?
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:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013  Student
It is a stereotype. And no, I'm talking about USA people from the northern part of the USA. I was talking about people who come from North America, and if you didn't understand that is because you didn't even think about what America is, and *if* that is the case, then you just proved my statement that they're self centered. Of course the term used was wrong, I shouldn't have included Canadians because they're not like the USA--they're much nicer.

When you study pop culture of the USA you notice that the theme is so overused and batantly silly that it clearly shows a concern of the media to try to look politically correct, and then it slips and makes stereotypical characters right after criticizing racism. Or any other kind of prejudice.
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:icondreamscape195:
Dreamscape195 Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013
Actually I was well aware that you probably meant all of north america, but being that it is so commonly used to mean just the USA I couldn't be sure. And even *if* I had meant it that way I would have proved no such thing. *If* all of your opinions and statements here are based on "proof" such as this, something one individual has done or said generalized to entire continents, then clearly your arguments hold no water whatsoever.

Lol, "Canadians are much nicer" I have more than a few Canadians I should introduce you to. You really can't generalize like that. People are people and while culture does have great influence it won't change who a person really is entirely, and a**holes exist everywhere. In fact, *if* we're using the "you just proved my point about an entire group of people all on your own" logic then meeting these couple of people should officially make all Canadians misinformed self righteous bigots in your eyes. But I'll just hope when you said that it was an attempt to call me out as a poor example for people to follow out of anger at my disagreeing with you and not an actual policy you follow when gathering "proof".

Apparently you have no official study to back your claims up though? Just a vague "when you study pop culture of the USA"? Which leaves me to assume it's just your own prejudices based on what you personally have seen. Especially because it's not fair to judge a nation by it's famous people. That's like going back to the whole "every German was a Nazi" shtick just because Hitler was the face of Germany at the time. Sure a lot of people are self centered here, but that's true of anywhere and your country isn't above it either. If your problem is with pop culture and news programs, then say pop culture and news programs, not culture in general and by extension all peoples living in those countries.

When dealing with trends and generalizations it's better to say "north Americans are more likely to" or "it's more commonly seen in north american countries", these suggest trends and patterns, not blanket absolutes with the implication of minute exceptions.
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:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013  Student
So basically you decided to attack me based on something you just assumed I assumed and now suddenly I'm the guy who's saying you're an evil bastard and that all "Americans" are? I said "if" because I really thought you might have taken a wild guess based on other contexts, and most likely didn't think that America necessarily mean the USA--or am I wrong for assuming the best option? If you could take your time to read the other conversation I had with :iconusagi-sarah:, you might notice that I meant absolutely no offense to USA people personally, but merely described a common thing that is visible in a culture--through "famous people", yes, and through the fact that your ancestors decided to call themselves Americans, and generally generalized stuff about your country's culture. Of course generalizations are incredibly imprecise, and I stand by the fact that I'm talking about a *visible culture* and *not about the members of that select society*. So please forgive me if I offended you, I had no intention whatsoever. And the thing about Canada was the exact same thing: a reading of their visible culture and their general behavior, and *not* saying they're all nice people, because I myself have talked to a few really bratty ones.

Also, all my claims are based on context studied history and geography, reports from people who have been there, critical analysis of pop culture and its possible connections to actual culture, personal experience, differences in teaching methodologies in schools and universities, and other things that I might not remember. It's hard to quote stuff that is not learned from an Internet link.
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:icondreamscape195:
Dreamscape195 Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013
You explicit said that if I'd believed that way I was proving your point about the entire culture. Don't put that on me ;p those were your words. Secondly how is that assuming the best option? By even throwing that "if" in there you were implying that you thought that was the case.

I'm not taking offense for the USA's sake, I'm taking it for all of north america or whoever else comes under such rudely stated and broadly blanked scrutiny with nothing to back it up.
If you'd stated that as such in the first place, it would never have come off as it did. Every word down to syntax indicated that you meant every individual within the culture, including the brash statement that I would be proving your point. Unfortunately visible culture is hardly ever the truth. What gets spread around the most is often what we find to be most interesting, which often includes what we find humorous for one reason or another. This means torrents of stupidity, self-centeredness, poorly chosen words, etc. are spread around on television shows and news programs, often because we find the sheer lack of intelligence necessary for things like that to happen, funny. It doesn't mean those things are an adequate example of our every day life style on a broad scale. At least such is the case both here in mid Michigan and in Beijing China (and while the latter may sound random, it's where my father lived for a few years and I've visited before. Their television programs are... far different from the ones I'm used to here but they also reflected a much *stupider* version of life that we did not witness anything of the sort actually within the community).

Also you raise an interesting point, and a question that I do not know the answer to. Since (with the exception of native american peoples) what became the USA was the first area of the north Americas to be inhabited, was the Continent or the country named first? Even if the continent was named first, since they are the only "united states" in the area, was it really such a terrible thing to call themselves the United States of America? The "of" itself shows that they saw themselves as part of a larger America. Where the term "Americans" came from on the other hand, is more towards your point. Although I do see very little else to go on for a shorthand... "united statians" for example? I'd say defaulting to "Americans" looks more like finding the path of least resistance, lazyness, when deciding the term than one born of self centeredness.

While I can give merit to history, geography, people who've been there (preferably people who lived there, as tourists often end up being around other tourists more than locals), and personal experience, "critical analysis" is little more than musing and hypothesizing and not really based in fact. Still, speculations about trends are neither a crime nor an insult; it's when they are stated as fact and presented as absolute that an issue arises. I wouldn't trust an internet link anyway, at least not unless it was from a viable source. Anyone can make false claims, hasty generalizations, and brash assertions with nothing to really back it up and toss it onto the internet after all - links to stuff like that isn't always credible.
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:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013  Student
Well, excuse my syntax then. As I said, it was not my intention. If you still do not want to forgive me for that than I guess it's your choice.

I also live in a counrty in which media seems to emphasize weird aspects of our culture to a level that borders ridiculous, and I wouldn't want anyone deciding their opinions on my *personal* culture judging from where I live. But to a lot of people in here, the reflection of the media is very true. And somehow they don't seem to realize the bad aspects of themselves that they think these manifestations of our culture represent. Basically there're lots of bad stuff they should be able to see by actually liking that kind of media, but they apparently don't, and that's very sad because it says a lot about how bad education is in this country.

But anyways, the necessity of the American title is somewhat relative. It really dependns on which language you're speaking. Even in Spanish (your Mexican neighboors should be able to confirm that) they have a different word for USA people: "estadounidense." And it's the same word in Portuguese as well. It might be a little naive to think that they named themselves United States of America just because they're states that decided to unite under a single flag of a continent (yes the continent was named first), but that's really not very solid to go on. It's somewhat stretching it calling it simply a fact of laziness instead of thinking it was because of nationalism. And throughout history the USA has clearly positioned itself towards being a controling country in the continent, medling in internal affairs of its neighbors simply because they had the power to, and that it would make them the winning party in the end. One might be able to classify that as self-centered and/or ufanist. Of course, it's ridiculous to label the population of a country by the actions of its rulers--although the arab-terrorist stereotype is quite common over there and in some places in Europe, isn't it? (meaning many still think of mid-eastern citizens as approving of their countries' rulers' methods, which is definitely not the case)--and it seems that there're always some really conservative (strong) parties that approve of questionable ways of living, never noticing or respecting other cultures inside their country when they see it. Of course, it's not the majority, probably, but there're some strong parties that think like that.
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:icondreamscape195:
Dreamscape195 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013
I don't think we can solely blame nationalism either though. Sure the founders were enthusiastic about their new-found freedom and new country, but what fledgling country's founders aren't? It was probably a combination of both.

Oh no doubt, the USA (or it's government rather)has definitely been controlling and meddling, though if you look at recent times and the people's reactions to these things you'll see the public is often opposed to this meddling too. There was great opposition to troops remaining in Iraq to impose democracy, for example. Though that's not to say the majority wasn't originally behind the "war on Iraq," but as soon as it turned from defense/revenge to meddlling the people's support fell away. It seems as though the nation's leaders are more at fault for that than anyone. For example, when Osama Bin Laden was killed, the president had practically nothing to do with it, all he really did was give the 'go ahead' order for the final assassination, but, when he went on air to address the nation and announce bin laden's death he made it sound as if he was solely responsible for it.

Ah, in the years following the September 11th attack of the twin towers we did see a massive influx of racism towards people who appeared to be Arab or Muslim, but in my area we're fortunate enough to have a fairly high population of people of those ethnicities and friends don't turn on friends just because others who look like them did something bad. It died down very quickly in our area. I saw someone in our grocery story just a couple days ago wearing his turban, walking around with his wife. They were smiling, chatting, and I certainly didn't notice any bad looks (though I wasn't exactly looking for them, in fact the only reason I even noticed the couple was because he had his turban on and it's not something I often see). But I see your point. That particular stereotype is still strong in the USA and it probably is due to a combination of strong willed and strongly opinionated parties, and distasteful jokes and comedians.
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(1 Reply)
:iconusagi-sarah:
Usagi-Sarah Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013
that is rude of you too say...I am from the United States and didn't think once that it was racist for a black guy to be a gardener..some people might not realize the artist isn't American either. I certainly don't see racism in everything.
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:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Student
Yes, that was rude of me. Let me correct myself. The North American culture is somewhat self centered regarding connecting with other cultures. The very fact they call themselves "Americans" refects that. By saying culture I limit myself to a tendency that happens mostly over there, reflected in all of its cultural productions, such as movies, series, movements, books, comic books, comments on the Internet, etc. Furthermore, I mean not that ALL North Americans act persay, but that it's typical of their culture to do so. It's a generalization and therefore it's imprecise, but it still reflects some truth.
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:iconusagi-sarah:
Usagi-Sarah Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
Also North America makes up more than the United States it consists of Mexico,Greenland,Canada, and quite a few others as well. North America is a continent but I assume you mean the US due to talking about us calling ourselves Americans.
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:iconusagi-sarah:
Usagi-Sarah Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
American's call themselves Americans because the country is called The United States of America...what else could we call ourselves? other countries call it America without even using the US part of it..I don't see how it is self centered? It's hard to even say what culture we have since we have a mixture of cultures. My culture tends to be southern but now mixed with Asian due to my husband..I don't particularly think the US has a single true culture anymore because so many are mixed together. I guess I'm not truly understanding your initial point here? why is American media suddenly American culture? or do you mean particular cultural things included in our media? anyway I am interested in your opinions :)
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:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013  Student
Okay, let's say North Americans isn't the right term either. Canadians are indeed very different, culturally. In my language there IS another way of saying "Americans" and it is "Estado-unidense" (it derives from the name "Estados Unidos," and, just in case, no, I'm not speaking in Spanish--not that you thought I did). The concept of calling yourselves American is much more than the name of your country. It is saying that the only important continent in America is the USA. It's obviously done on purpose by your ancestors (not *yours* but your people's) and most of you don't even realize it, but it's true. You see, America is a continent, not a country. I never said you specifically are self-centered. But really, most of USA people don't even know which language Brazilians speak. Hell, I don't doubt most people over there label all countries below Mexico as "under-developed" and "latinos." And a very small number of USA people bother learning another language besides English, yet most expect people to talk to them in Enlish anywhere, everywhere.

And you HAVE a culture. Of course you do. Just because it's a result of many cultures it doesn't mean it's not a unique culture by itself. Saying you don't have a culture is like saying Spain doesn't have one true culture because they have Arabic culture mixed in their history. And I can say that because I ALSO live in a country that has many mixed cultures, because just like yours, my country's population is descendant of immigrants and it has a culture of its own.
Also, I never said the USA's culture IS its media. I said it's culture is REFLECTED in its media--just like any place's is. Watching anime and dorama you can learn many things from Japan's culture--albeit many things are innacurate and exaggerated, just like in USA's media--but that doesn't mean THAT is their culture. For instance, in Japan liking anime is not well received, except for classics like One Piece and Dragon Ball; yet anime is a part of their culture, whether they like it or not. It's like saying Powerpuff Girls is part of the USA's culture. Any classic childhood cartoons can compose greatly of a country's culture, but that doesn't mean it IS its culture.
Please don't feel offended towards a critique against your country. I have never personally insulted you nor ALL of USA people in any way. I merely pointed a somewhat annoying trait of its culture.
Another aspect of your culture: USA people are incredibly old-fashionedly nationalist. I guess Europe countries are too, but USA's is a different kind of nationalism. This one is hard to explain and I won't venture doing so because I'd need to study the subject more carefully, but I"m sure there's some truth to that theory.
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:iconusagi-sarah:
Usagi-Sarah Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
well the old fashioned nationalists are the older people of our country and some of the young that have gotten caught up in it. It is the same here in Japan. There are allot of nationalists. I would say you are wrong on the anime part though about it not being well received. Allot of people watch anime here and if you say you watch anime you are usually asked which ones.
Some people don't watch it anymore but have memories of watching it when younger and some people continue to watching it. All of my friends here have had some interest in manga or anime at some point in their lives whether it is now or in the past so anime really is part of the pop culture here and not looked down on. The manga style is even used in magazines, advertisements and even in school books. but not I wasn't saying that is what you said just asking if it was as I didn't completely understand what you meant.

Allot of people all over the world don't know what language Brazilians speak so that isn't a trait only in the US. In Japan allot of people think they speak Spanish but they don't they speak a form of Portuguese. There is a large community of Brazilian people in the city I live in called Komaki. I went to Japanese language school with allot of Brazilian's a Peruvian, a Bolivian and a Colombian and somebody always made mistakes with us haha speaking Spanish or Portugese to me or Spanish speakers or English or Spanish to a Brazilian.

When I say we don't have a particular culture it is in comparison to places with an absolute culture native to their country such as Asian countries.

I understand that you aren't insulting me or my country..and I am sorry if you are under the impression that I am offended or angry! I just like debating peoples different ideas and adding my own.

Allot of people have misconceptions about other countries and I like to see other peoples views and understand why they think they way they do if it's an information that is not particularly true to the country or region.
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:iconspicybleachedhead:
SpicyBleachedHead Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013  Student
Well, I've spoken with many Japanese people and I speak a little of it and have many friends within the "Japanese" community in here (in quotation marks because most are not actually born in Japan, but come from Japanese families), as I'm kinda part of it for being a descendant. People my age usually like anime and manga, and I like them too, but the thing about it not having a good image in Japan is what I've heard from Japanese teachers (they usually came from Osaka) who are slightly older than my generation (around 27-28), and though they liked anime/manga they warned me about Japanese people not receiving the whole anime/manga thing in the same level as we do here. By the same level I mean going to conventions and being really into the whole anime culture and stuff. I know manga is read in Japan like a hobbie for passing time by young people, but I'm not so sure about older generations and their hobbies. As I said, the classics are really loved by everyone, so I don't think anyone would really hate anime like the devil, aside from isolated cases.

And well, I know the whole thing about people all around the world being ignorant regarding Brazilians speaking Portuguese. I once spoke to a Russian girl who tried speaking Spanish to me. It's just that god forbid anyone from thinking UK is England, but they can't even bother to have lessons in school about 1500's America's colonization. And speacially the USA, because they're part of this whole historic process, a little paying attention to class wouldn't hurt. It's kinda of a peeve of every Brazilian, you know?

Also, I find it quite strange that there're Spanish speaking Brazilians (with immigrant families) in Japan. It's not common in Brazil for immigrant families to not learn Portuguese properly or speak with any accent whatsoever. Everyone who's born in Brazil learns proper Portuguese. Unless they're not actually Brazilians, but really Peruvians, Bolivians and Colombians.
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:iconusagi-sarah:
Usagi-Sarah Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2013
They aren't truly spanish speaking but they say that they can get the gist of some Spanish enough to understand the translators in our classes. The translators varied between Portugese and Spanish never English in my case I was all on my own but grateful for the English speaking Brazilians in my class for helping translate.

I am 26 and my husband is 30 most of my friends are in the 24-40 age range. There are conventions here but not on the level of what you see outside of Japan. We have Comiket in Tokyo which receives massive amounts of attendees every year and Cosplay event in Nagoya which I got to attend one year and Brazil one the contest with some pretty awesome costumes!

Osaka may not be big in the anime area but I have only been there once. Nagoya and Tokyo are pretty heavy when it comes to cosplay and anime and you can find Anime shops that are packed full every weekend including my favorite the Jump shop with Shonen Jump merch. Manga cafes are always pretty full as well and we often have to wait to go in.

While not all are crazy about Anime just like in any country you will visit they do have infinitely more massive fan bases than I would think the US has anyway. I have at least 3 different channels that play Anime exclusively and one that plays Anime and Drama's only haha. I would say the warnings would probably span to you won't find people walking around in cosplay 24/7 or wearing anime shirts all the time while they do exist they are usually made to look fashionable. I guess they probably want you to know that Japanese aren't all huge fanatics that walk around advertising their current favorite anime with flair more in subdued ways like key chains and phone straps. That is my experience from it so far!

Yeah we learn a lot about both American history and UK history in high school for the most part but at 26 I have forgotten a large majority of what I learned in school but do enjoy relearning it online when I have the time! I have a Japanese friend who was told by another American woman who was in her late 30's that Christopher Columbus invented Thanksgiving in the United States...I face palmed pretty hard and had to reeducate her...it is sad some people don't even know the roots of their own countries holidays..
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(1 Reply)
:iconvalkasar:
valkasar Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
in my language we call US citizens "unatedstateans" as a rough translation.

By "american culture" most people mean (and by default is what people understand when they read it) to the mcdonalds redneck gun loving self centered who think he's way too awesome and better than the other people stereotype

interesting that stereotypes came in topic in a non SatW thread, btw
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:iconusagi-sarah:
Usagi-Sarah Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
Those stereotypes do exist but are not as common as people would think haha most of us are young people fighting the good fight for people to have better lives within out own country and outside of our own country. I wouldn't say America is the best but to say we are self centered for shortening our countries name to America isn't right. United Stateans haha that's a new one for me! it is kind of long and tedious to say too so that would probably be a reason we don't use it. In Japan they call it Amerika and Amerikajin for America and Americans it would be interesting to know what other countries call the United States!
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:icongrazatt:
grazatt Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013
So Tim has a big Ding-Dong?
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:iconillegalsympathy:
IllegalSympathy Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
It's so big Humon even did comic about it
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:iconpizzashoepie:
Pizzashoepie Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013
I love anything that you do, and how happy your art seems to make you, but can I request more about the German? His story was intriguing ^-^
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:iconalexpaok44:
alexpaok44 Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013
Glorious. XD
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:iconbubbles123karate:
bubbles123karate Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Student General Artist
Yep. Our stereotype of a gardener tends to be either Irish or a Yorkshireman. Honestly, we're like hobbits when it comes to gardening.
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:iconnullnomore:
NullNoMore Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
In (trashy) novels I've read, a well-mannered lady of the house has to ask the gardener before she starts cutting flowers, picking strawberries, mucking about in the garden.
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:iconbubbles123karate:
bubbles123karate Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Student General Artist
Well, would YOU want to anger a real life Samwise Gamgee?

Seriously though, from what I understand of posher circles, that is a thing. Makes sense, a proper garden tends to be a delicately balanced ecosystem, and the only person who can parse it is the gardener. I'd certainly ask before I touched anything.
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