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December 19, 2010
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No Religion to Divide by humon No Religion to Divide by humon
The four deities that are seen in my Witch Hunter story. On the left, the Goddess and God from the Wiccan religion, and on the right an angel and the Devil from Christianity.

People seemed to assume the story was either pro-pagan or pro-Christianity, but one of the themes of the story was actually that humans have no way of controlling the gods, no matter how many religious rituals they preformed.
Therefore the godsí interactions with humans seem very random to the characters. The Wiccan god saves a witch hunter, and the Christian angel makes the witch hunter help the witches. Because they cannot be concerned by silly things like human rules (aka religion) to decide who they will help.

Ironically the only deity who honestly cares about the human rules is the Devil, which is why he is the only one looking straight as us in the picture. :devil:
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:iconbloodyheadmonster:
BloodyHeadMonster Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I love, love, LOVE that devil. It's like, he looks creepy enough, and also looks evil, and the thing of watching at the viewer is really cool too! I just love it.
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:iconpurplegc:
purplegc Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
0.o  I'm not sure why you would have included Christianity in this then, considering your description. Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to be rude, but the concept is kind of off. Christianity (unless it's Roman Catholic or similar) doesn't revolve around rituals. It's a saving relationship with God who cares about you and works in you, not you working to get God to love you or do what you want. 
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:iconladycoldwinter:
LadyColdWinter Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2014
What about Prayer? Baptism? Holy Communion? Sunday Mass?

They count as rituals, I'm not sure if all Christians follow along those lines of worship but I'm pretty sure such is done in more than simply the Roman Catholic Church.
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:iconpurplegc:
purplegc Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Prayer is a way for the believer to fellowship and talk to God, ask for forgiveness of sins, give thanks, and pray for other people or for guidance on something. Baptism, I believe, is a symbolic sign for the believer and a public commitment that they have died to themselves and risen to a new life in Christ. Communion is, again, symbolic, and done to remember and reflect on what Christ did for us and give thanks, and we do it knowing he is coming again soon. Mass is Roman Catholic, and my theology is protestant. We gather to worship, however, because it is fellowship with both God and other Christian people. We hear and learn from the bible there as well. It's a time for thanksgiving and edification of the body of Christ. None of it has to do with doing rituals to gain God's favor or get Him to scratch our back if we scratch His. The point of Christianity is that we as believers become servants to God and to other people that we may spread the good news so others may come to salvation. God does not become a servant to us. It's the other way around. 
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:iconladycoldwinter:
LadyColdWinter Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2014
To summarise, I truly wish I could clean up this comment problem, anything with a prescribed order, such as baptism always anointing people with water/oil and Communion symbolically consuming the body and blood of christ in the form of bread and wine, which is the predetermined event of these ceremonies, makes it eligible for categorization as a Ritual.
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:iconladycoldwinter:
LadyColdWinter Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2014
ritual
ˈrɪtʃʊəl/
noun
noun: ritual; plural noun: rituals
1.
a religious or solemn ceremony consisting of a series of actions performed according to a prescribed order.
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:iconladycoldwinter:
LadyColdWinter Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
Ugh, sorry about the whole separated comments thing, this comment thing seems to be having a problem putting everything in one, basically, anything that can be considered a religious ceremony, regardless of symbolism, whether it's pledging service to a god or invoking them for blessings etc. Counts as a ritual.
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:iconpurplegc:
purplegc Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Well, ok. But my main point is that the rituals aren't focused on to get something from God. The description above indicates rituals in religion are used to 'control' God. We don't do those things to get God to do something for us in return. We don't do good works to get God's approval, and we don't do rituals to get on his good side or to invoke Him to do something for us. We may ask prayerfully for something if it's within His will, but that's for Him to decide and us to be obedient to.
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:iconladycoldwinter:
LadyColdWinter Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2014
I don't see how that veers from what was in the picture's description, he says that one of the themes in his story is that humans have no way to control the gods. There's no difference between "asking prayerfully" the Abrahamic Christian god or doing the same to one of the Gods of an Ancient Pantheon, if gods could be so easily controlled by anyone who performs a ceremonial set of acts then they'd be fairly poor gods.

Personally, I just perceive all gods as inhumanly powerful tyrants.
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:iconladycoldwinter:
LadyColdWinter Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
Though, I admit, prayer itself may be exempt, as it's more of a dialogue (monologue, really) that can be done anywhere without any specific procedure to follow.
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